Take Your Personality Out Of Your Home Before Seliing

There’s a lot of design trends that you’ll want to keep up with as a homeowner. What are people doing to their backyards to make them more beautiful? What types of countertops are buyers looking for these days? Some trends are beneficial. However, there’s a lot of trends that can be detrimental to your home. You want your home to be an expression of who you are, however, there are some trends that just aren’t attractive to buyers. 

Bright And Bold May Not Be Beautiful 

While that lime green room may look really attractive to you, it probably won’t look as good to anyone else. The best colors for paint inside of your home are the neutral colors. These include beiges, grays and soft whites. The most important thing is to keep your paint color consistent throughout your home. Not that you can’t change shades from room to room, but don’t make the paint change too drastic.  

No One Really Likes Shiny Things

As much as you may like shiny accessories throughout the home, it’s not going to be everyone’s thing. Although people will be decorating your home on their terms once they buy it, it’s important to note that busy isn’t always better. People need to be able to see past how you have set up your home to see the potential it holds for them.  

An Open Floor Plan That’s Too Open

You can take the idea of an open floor plan to an extreme. There are certain rooms in the home that just deserve privacy. The bathrooms and the bedrooms need walls surrounding them to give people the space and quiet that they need. If there’s no good way for you to fix this issue, you may want to find some room screens before your open house in order to keep buyers interested.  

Converted Rooms Squash Vision

If you have a third bedroom that you have converted into a home gym, that’s great for you. It may be hard for other people visiting the home to realize what the room could be used for. You may not have to move everything before an open house, but try to keep the room open for possibility.     

Carpeting Kills Buyer’s Dreams

There’s not many more terrifying things to buyers than walking into a home and seeing wall-to-wall carpeting. Their minds race, thinking of the possibilities of how to get beloved hardwood floors into the picture. If there’s floor under your carpet and you know you’re going to sell soon, you’d be wise to tear up the carpet and polish up those floors. It will attract more buyers and sell faster because people will know they have that much less work to do once they move in. 

The Takeaway

 The important point here is that when you’re getting ready to show your home, you’ll want to take your personality out of the picture. Buyers need to have space to get the vision to see how they can make your former home their own. Reversing a few of the personal upgrades that you have made to your home can help you to make it a more welcoming place for new owners to begin a journey.

Tips for Submitting a Great Home Offer

Ready to submit an offer on a home? Putting together a proposal that stands out in a home seller’s eyes is key.

With the right home offer, you can improve your chances of securing your dream house without delay. Plus, dedicating time and resources to put together a home offer that works for both you and a home seller is sure to accelerate your journey from homebuyer to homeowner.

How can you improve your chances of submitting an offer that a home seller is sure to accept? Here are three tips to help a homebuyer submit a standout home offer.

1. Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage.

In many instances, a home offer may be contingent upon financing. And if a homebuyer has to secure financing after submitting a proposal, this individual could risk missing out on an opportunity to purchase his or her dream house.

Comparatively, a homebuyer who gets pre-approved for a mortgage will have the necessary financing in place when he or she submits an offer. As a result, this individual’s offer may stand out from other proposals, particularly to a home seller who wants to speed up the home selling process.

2. Consider a Quick Home Inspection.

Don’t ask the home seller for 15 or 30 days to conduct a home inspection. Instead, be ready to conduct a home inspection as soon as possible.

You may need only a few days to set up a home inspection. As such, if your offer includes a request for five or 10 days to complete a home assessment, it may stand out from others.

Also, if you find your dream home, you may want to consider purchasing the house “as is.” Doing so may allow you to forgo negotiations between a homebuyer and home seller after a home inspection.

If you submit an “as is” home offer, you will be able to learn about the condition of a property before you buy it. However, after a home inspection, you will be unable to ask the home seller to complete repairs. At this point, if you find the house fails to meet your expectations, you can either walk away or buy the home in its current condition.

3. Add an Escalation Clause to Your Offer.

An escalation clause can help you compete against other homebuyers in a fierce real estate market. It enables you to increase your offer by a set amount over any other bids to a certain level. As a result, including an escalation clause in your home offer can help you avoid the risk of overpaying for a house and improve your chances of securing your dream residence at the same time.

Ask your real estate agent to include an escalation clause in your home offer. Your real estate agent can help you submit the perfect proposal, and ultimately, boost your chances of getting a “Yes” from a home seller.

Use the aforementioned tips, and you can bolster your chances of getting the right house at the right price.

You Could Build Your Next Home

Build a house using custom specifications and you may get the house you’ve always dreamed about. To save money, you could also purchase a house that is being built to specifications developed by a previous buyer or developer. To avoid building an entire house, you could also add rooms onto your existing home.

Avoid rushing into a decision, as there are pros and cons to building a new house. For starters, you’ll incur floor plan development, construction and cleaning expenses that you’d avoid if you bought an existing house.

Unique costs associated with building a house – In addition to paying for the plot of land that you will build a house on, there’s the cost of laying the house’s foundation and building out the structure, including wiring, drainage, sewage and landscaping costs. You could also be responsible for the costs of repairs or renovations should initial floor plans need to be adjusted.

Meet the neighbors – Whether you build a house or buy an existing home, location is key. The neighborhood your home is located in will influence your property taxes, homeowners insurance and the value of your home.

Ethical builders – Check local licensing agencies and organizations like the Better Business Bureau for complaints on builders you’re thinking about working with. Ask your real estate agent if she knows the builders. Do your homework. The skill level, professionalism and ethical standards of the builder that you go with could make your home building experience good or a nightmare.

Weather conditions – Some older homes may not be prepared to handle extreme weather conditions. If you’ve ever lived in a house that flooded following every hard rain, you know firsthand that just because a house looks good, does not mean that it’s built for harsh weather conditions. Building your own house could increase the likelihood that your home will withstand harsh climate changes and weather conditions.

Code standards – Build your own house and you could meet code standards to operate a business out of your house or turn a portion of your home into a rental property. You wouldn’t have to spend more money to renovate the property if you include these design requirements into the initial build.

Recreation – Add space to build an in ground swimming pool or an outdoor dining area into the blueprints and you could avoid having to pay to add these features to an existing home.

Commute – Because land to build a new house may require you to relocate to a more open area, building a house could lengthen your work commute.

You’re smart not rush into making a decision on where you’ll live. Your decision could impact you for years, perhaps generations. You could opt for an older, traditional house like a brick bungalow or a four-story Victorian. But, depending on the age of the house, that choice could require repairs in the near future. Of course, you could go with a modern home. But, you’d still have to consider the condition of the house and how well previous occupants cared for the home.

Building a new house could increase the likelihood that your house will be in excellent condition. It could also ensure that you get amenities that you want, yet, at a higher price. Similar to shopping for an existing house, the more clearly you visualize your custom designed home, the better you will be able to work with a realtor to get the land plot that you need to build your dream house on.

How to Choose the Best Real Estate Agent For Your Needs

Studies have shown that people tend to make decisions — both trivial and life-changing — based on emotional factors, rather than on hard, cold facts. Whether you’re buying a car, hiring an employee, picking a college, or selecting a real estate agent, there will probably be a lot of feelings that come into play as you weigh all the pluses and minuses.

When it comes to choosing a real estate agent or Realtor®, first impressions and “chemistry” play a major role in the decision. While good rapport is a key ingredient in a successful relationship with a real estate agent, it is necessary to strike a balance between the agent’s likability and their performance record.

For example, when meeting with prospective real estate agents, it is considered appropriate to ask questions about how long they’ve been licensed, whether or not real estate is their full-time job, and any professional designations or certifications they’ve acquired.

It’s a good sign when real estate agents show a commitment to honing their skills and expanding their expertise. There are about two dozen potential certifications that The National Association of REALTORS® and other organizations offer — ranging from being an Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®) to being a Seniors Real Estate Specialist (SRES®).

Guidelines For Choosing a Realtor

Here are a few more “talking points” to keep in mind when interviewing real estate agents or Realtors.

  • Experience: The length of time they’ve been in the real estate business and the number of clients they’ve represented in the past year can be useful points of reference in comparing qualifications.
  • Knowledge: Your initial meeting should reveal a lot to you about the agent’s familiarity with the local housing market and their comfort level with topics like mortgage providers, the application process, property inspections, closing costs, and marketing strategies for your property.
  • Track record: A couple useful pieces of information you can request are examples of how long their listings have stayed on the market before being sold and how much the final sale price differed from the initial asking price.
  • Availability and communication style: Although you certainly wouldn’t want to be an agent’s only client, it’s nice to feel that you’re among their top priorities. While it might be unrealistic to expect daily progress reports, you do want to hear from them on a regular basis. Responsiveness is also the mark of a superior real estate agent. Let’s face it: Selling a house or looking for a new home can be stressful enough, without having to wonder if your agent is looking out for your best interests and providing you with top-notch service. Key takeaway: Asking them how long they typically take to respond to phone messages and emails is a good question to raise in your first meeting.

The ideal way to find a personable and results-oriented real estate professional is by getting recommendations from your family, friends, or trusted acquaintances. If that’s not possible, it’s acceptable to ask agents for phone numbers or email addresses of two or three recent clients who could be contacted as references. You’ll generally find home sellers and buyers to be pretty candid about their experience with a particular real estate agent or Realtor.